Renaissance Polychrome Sculpture in Puglia and Basilicata

http://qspace.library.queensu.ca/handle/1974/29070

The Renaissance art in Puglia and Basilicata is much less known than the heavily touristed and much studied sites in central Italy. Life-sized painted sculptures, many carved out of local stone, inhabit rough-walled cave churches and elaborate classically inspired mausolea. An elegantly attired angel hacks repeatedly at a cowering dragon, a saint looks unperturbed as her fingers sink into a lion’s mouth, a mother grins toothily as she cuddles her baby, and shepherds blow into bagpipes while stone sheep graze nearby. Artists placed holy narratives in spaces like the rocky landscape around them, and dressed sacred personages in local dress, while at the same time harkening back to an ancient past shrouded in myth and mystery. The art is both distinctively local and cosmopolitan, drawing upon influences from around the Adriatic and beyond. This open access database offers high-resolution images of and information about (with a catalog entry and bibliography for each work) over 100 objects, along with an interactive digital map. Approximately 1,000 high-resolution photographs can be downloaded and used free of charge for research, teaching, and publication. This database was created by Claire Litt and Una D’Elia (Queen’s University).

In addition to supporting scholarship on this understudied region by offering open access photographs, this database is a rich resource for teaching, as students can carry out research, curate, and publish their own virtual exhibitions using the database. (Links to undergraduate and graduate student exhibitions are provided on the homepage.)

Renaissance and Baroque Polychrome Sculpture in Lombardy and Piedmont

http://qspace.library.queensu.ca/handle/1974/29202

The mountains and lakes of Lombardy and Piedmont are both picturesque and rich with little-known cultural heritage. In the Renaissance and Baroque, northern Italy, which bordered Protestant lands, was central to promoting and supporting the Catholic faith. Life-sized painted sculptures made of wood, terracotta, and other materials were arranged to create naturalistic tableaux in chapels on holy mountains (Sacri Monti), pilgrimage sites which the devout visited at night, whipping themselves before sculptures must have seemed to come to life by the flickering light of lanterns. Sculpted bodies with a range of skin tones, some thin from suffering and illness and others Herculean in their muscular energy, have actual hair and are bound with real ropes or eat from real dishes. Other fleshy sculptures inhabit huge, theatrical altarpieces. Many of these living statues continue to be the focus of cult today and so are adorned with real jewelry and other offerings made by the faithful. These sculptures are site specific, embedded in the landscape, politics, and devotional practices of the region, but also the work of cosmopolitan artists and patrons with international connections. This database offers high-resolution images of and information about over 185 sculptures and sculptural groups, along with an interactive digital map. The information is in the form of a catalog entry with bibliography for each sculpture or sculptural group. Over 1,300 high-resolution photographs are available for download and can be used free of charge for research, teaching, and publication. This database was created by Kennis Forte and Una D’Elia (Queen’s University).

In addition to supporting scholarship in this understudied area by offering open access photographs that can be published free of charge, this database is a rich resource for teaching, as students can carry out research, curate, and publish their own virtual exhibitions using the database (links to undergraduate and graduate student exhibitions provided on the homepage).

Dubrovnik: Civitas et Acta Consiliorum – Visualizing Development of the Late Medieval Urban Fabric

https://ducac.ipu.hr/project/

The DUCAC project – “Dubrovnik Civitas et Acta Consiliorum. Visualizing Development of the Late Medieval Urban Fabric” studied the relationships between the space-policy of the Dubrovnik government, its implementation, and the real changes in the urban fabric. The archival investigation examined the deliberations of the city councils (the Major, the Minor, and the Senate) from the first half of the 15th century. These deliberations are written down in 35 volumes. They have 7,972 folia, i.e. 15,944 pages, written predominantly in Latin. Focusing on topics of interest to art historians, the deliberations revealing information on the urban fabric – more precisely information about its construction, use, maintenance, as well as the management of these processes, were transcribed. The number of the total counted transcribed deliberations is 3341. They are offered in a map searchable database where deliberations can be found in accordance with the location of the building or the space they record. Only some of these newly discovered documents were thoroughly studied so far, comparing the data from the deliberations with the existing urban tissue and previously collected architectural, photographic, and archival documentation. These studies resulted in 2D or 3D visualizations, and are duly listed on the project web page. The database still offers abundant data for further in-depth research of Dubrovnik urban history.

vHMML: Online Resources for the Study of Manuscript Cultures

https://www.vhmml.org/

vHMML offers resources and tools for the study of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern manuscripts, archives, and art and currently features manuscript and art cultures from Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. The site houses high-resolution images of manuscripts, many of them digitized as part of HMML’s global mission to preserve and share important, endangered, and inaccessible manuscript collections through digital photography, archiving, and cataloging. It also contains descriptions of manuscripts from HMML’s legacy microfilm collection, with scans of some of these films.

smarthistory

Smarthistory’s free, award-winning digital content unlocks the expertise of hundreds of leading scholars, making the history of art accessible and engaging to more people, in more places, than any other publisher. Smarthistory is the most visited art history resource in the world. Smarthistory supports students, instructors, and lifelong learners everywhere. While Smarthistory has a global reach, there are an abundance of resources about Renaissance art and architecture, in Europe and in places like the Americas and Asia. All essays and videos are made with content experts, and are the result of collaborations with more than 400+ scholars.

PHAROS: International Consortium of Photo Archives

http://pharosartresearch.org/

PHAROS is an international consortium of fourteen European and North American art historical photo archives committed to creating a digital research platform allowing for comprehensive consolidated access to photo archive images and their associated scholarly documentation. Established in 2013, PHAROS responds to the need for the rich visual and textual material held in art-historical photo archives, often unpublished and uniquely accessed through these repositories, to be made accessible for a new generation of scholars accustomed to online access to research materials. Consolidated access to tens of millions of images of works of art will be of immeasurable value to scholarship and teaching for a wide range of art-historical issues. These include provenance and attribution, conservation research, exhibition research, publication history, the history of photography, as well as the history of art history.  Above all, PHAROS aims to provide an essential resource for those engaged with new research methodologies within the framework of digital humanities.

Leonardo da Vinci: Between Art and Science (NEH Summer Institute, Florence Italy 2012), edited by Francesca Fiorani and Anna Marazeula Kim (March 2014)

https://faculty.virginia.edu/Fiorani/NEH-Institute/essays/introduction/

This collection of essays emerged from the research projects that 24 NEH Scholars developed during the NEH Summer Institute “Leonardo da Vinci: Between Art and Science” (Florence, Italy, June–July 2012), hosted by the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz (KHI). Over a period of three weeks, NEH Scholars explored the relations between art and science in the works of Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519), the versatile, canonical artist of western art who moved with equal ease among artistic, literary, intellectual and scientific circles. The Institute was organized around three major themes: Word and Image, Painting and Drawing, and Craftsmen and Scholars.