Renaissance Polychrome Sculpture in Tuscany

https://qspace.library.queensu.ca/handle/1974/14832

Renaissance Polychrome Sculpture in Tuscany is an open-access database of high-resolution photographs of and information (with a catalog entry and bibliography for each sculpture) about over 350 objects. Thousands of photographs are freely available for download and can be used without charge in research, teaching, and publication. An interactive digital map, colour coded by material, shows the current location of each object. The database would be of interest to scholars and students of art, materials and techniques, miraculous images, portraiture, gender representations, domestic devotion, altarpieces, hagiography, the history of childhood, orphanages, hospitals, pilgrimages, color, the surface or skin of an object, and other topics. (This database was created by Una D’Elia, Heather Merla, Rachel Boyd, and Bronwyn Bond, working with a team of librarians at Queen’s University, headed by Rosarie Coughlin.)

Dubrovnik: Civitas et Acta Consiliorum – Visualizing Development of the Late Medieval Urban Fabric

https://ducac.ipu.hr/project/

The DUCAC project – “Dubrovnik Civitas et Acta Consiliorum. Visualizing Development of the Late Medieval Urban Fabric” studied the relationships between the space-policy of the Dubrovnik government, its implementation, and the real changes in the urban fabric. The archival investigation examined the deliberations of the city councils (the Major, the Minor, and the Senate) from the first half of the 15th century. These deliberations are written down in 35 volumes. They have 7,972 folia, i.e. 15,944 pages, written predominantly in Latin. Focusing on topics of interest to art historians, the deliberations revealing information on the urban fabric – more precisely information about its construction, use, maintenance, as well as the management of these processes, were transcribed. The number of the total counted transcribed deliberations is 3341. They are offered in a map searchable database where deliberations can be found in accordance with the location of the building or the space they record. Only some of these newly discovered documents were thoroughly studied so far, comparing the data from the deliberations with the existing urban tissue and previously collected architectural, photographic, and archival documentation. These studies resulted in 2D or 3D visualizations, and are duly listed on the project web page. The database still offers abundant data for further in-depth research of Dubrovnik urban history.

Post-Reformation Digital Library

http://www.prdl.org/

A select database of digital books relating to the development of theology and philosophy during the Reformation and Post-Reformation/Early Modern Era (late 15th-18th c.). Late medieval and patristic works printed and referenced in the early modern era are also included. The PRDL is a project of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research.

Documenting the Impact of Your Humanities Program: A National Humanities Alliance Toolkit

https://www.nhalliance.org/impact_survey_toolkit

This resource is aimed at helping the humanities community collect data about the impact of programs such as professional development seminars, public humanities projects, and programs for students that prepare them for college and help them imagine humanities careers. These surveys are designed to support the humanities community in articulating the impact of its work and making the case for the resources to support it.

Manicule

Manicule

Manicule is a standalone React/Redux web application for presenting unique printed books and manuscripts in digital facsimile. Built and designed by Liza Daly and Whitney Trettien with support from the Price Lab for Digital Humanities at the University of Pennsylvania, Manicule allows editors to build guided tours through a book, annotate the edges of interesting pages, categorize and color-code each page in the facsimile, and visualize the book’s structure.

Virtual Paul’s Cross Project

Virtual Paul’s Cross Project

The Virtual Paul’s Cross Project uses visual and acoustic modeling software to combine visual images from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries with measurements of these buildings made during archaeological surveys of their foundations. The Project also integrates into the visual model the look of a November day in London. The acoustic simulation recreates the acoustic properties of Paul’s Churchyard. As a result, we may hear all two hours of John Donne’s sermon for Gunpowder Day in the space of its original delivery and acoustic context.

Digital Cavendish

Digital Cavendish

The Digital Cavendish aims to highlight digital research and scholarly projects that focus on any aspect of the life and writings of Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle (1623–73). Research may include digital images, annotations, text-mining, cultural archives, digital portfolios of manuscript and bibliographic research, etc. Ultimately, the site will grow to build a collaborative space for Cavendish scholars and students interested in the areas of literary, historical, digital, textual, bibliographic, manuscript, cultural, feminist, queer, and critical race studies, and become a space for those who wish to share their work.