TIDE: Keywords

What did it mean to be a stranger in sixteenth and seventeenth century England? How were other nations, cultures, and religions perceived? And what happened when individuals moved between languages, countries, religions, and spaces? TIDE: Keywords emerges from the collaborative work of ‘Travel, Transculturality, and Identity in England, c. 1550-1700’ (TIDE), a five-year interdisciplinary project funded by the European Research Council, exploring the development of the ideas of belonging and betweenness in early modern England.

Power of Petitioning in Seventeenth-Century England

https://petitioning.history.ac.uk/

‘The Power of Petitioning in Seventeenth-Century England’ is a two-year project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council which began in January 2019. The project team includes Brodie Waddell (Birkbeck), Jason Peacey (UCL) and Sharon Howard (Birkbeck), supported by many other scholars and contributors. This study will be the first to examine petitioning systematically at all levels of English government over the whole century. The project will create a valuable new resource by transcribing and digitising a corpus drawn from seven key collections of petitions held at national and local archives, totalling over 2,000 manuscripts. This corpus, when combined with careful contextualisation, allows us to offer new answers to crucial questions about the major social and political changes that unfolded in this formative period.

John Foxe’s The Acts and Monuments Online

http://www.johnfoxe.org/

Includes the unabridged texts of the four editions of this massive work published in John Foxe’s lifetime (1563, 1570, 1576, 1583). Search and view modern transcriptions that keep as close as possible to the original texts, identify the individuals and places that are mentioned in the text, and explore the latest scholarship to understand the sources upon which it was based, and the purposes for which they were deployed. Facsimiles of all the woodcut illustrations in the text can be viewed along with commentaries. Significant passages in Latin and Greek are translated.

Luminariam: Anthology of English Literature

A digital repository of English literature that includes full texts from the medieval to the Restoration periods with subject-specific sections devoted to religious writers, Renaissance drama, Metaphysical poets, and the Cavalier poets. Each entry includes a collection of resources including links to biographical material, texts, essays and other material.

The site also includes an extensive search function and an encylopedia that provides context for the literature.

Letters of William Herle Project

The letters of William Herle, intelligencer and diplomat for the Elizabethan court, offer a unique resource for Early Modern studies. Written over the period 1559-88, William Herle’s previously unedited, unpublished, and overlooked letters are richly textured. They offer a fascinating insight into the information networks and patronage systems of the political administration, as well as valuable material for religious, social, economic and cultural history. This online edition of his letters has been designed as a hypertext archive in order to maximize the ability to access and retrieve information from the corpus.

The Kit Marlowe Project

The Kit Marlowe Project is a digital space designed to introduce undergraduates with diverse majors to project-driven, research-based learning, and digital humanities practices in the context of studying one of Elizabethan England’s most compelling literary figures. As one of Shakespeare’s most famous contemporaries, Christopher Marlowe was a poet, playwright, and likely spy; his friends called him “Kit” and so do we. The site has been created so that students may curate an open-source collection of Marlowe’s works, contribute exhibits, encyclopedia, and bibliography entries, plus contribute to cultural preservation efforts by transcribing, encoding, and publishing archival works in an open-access forum. Excepting the About blogs, the Teaching Resources, the Contributor  Resources, and the Mini-Archive documentation, all content has been student-generated.