Margaret Cavendish’s Poems and Fancies

Margaret Cavendish’s Poems and Fancies – A digital critical edition, edited by Liza Blake

This website, as a freely available digital critical edition, makes the poetry of Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, freely available online for all to use, for teaching or research. More importantly, the full textual notes show the numerous variants across the three editions, which will allow readers of these excellent poems to see the tremendous amount of revision that Cavendish made to her poems.

Princeton Prosody Archive

The Princeton Prosody Archive is a full-text searchable database of thousands of digitized books in English published between 1570 and 1923. The Archive collects historical documents and highlights discourses about the study of language, the study of poetry, and where and how these intersect and diverge.

Power of Petitioning in Seventeenth-Century England

https://petitioning.history.ac.uk/

‘The Power of Petitioning in Seventeenth-Century England’ is a two-year project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council which began in January 2019. The project team includes Brodie Waddell (Birkbeck), Jason Peacey (UCL) and Sharon Howard (Birkbeck), supported by many other scholars and contributors. This study will be the first to examine petitioning systematically at all levels of English government over the whole century. The project will create a valuable new resource by transcribing and digitising a corpus drawn from seven key collections of petitions held at national and local archives, totalling over 2,000 manuscripts. This corpus, when combined with careful contextualisation, allows us to offer new answers to crucial questions about the major social and political changes that unfolded in this formative period.

Luminariam: Anthology of English Literature

A digital repository of English literature that includes full texts from the medieval to the Restoration periods with subject-specific sections devoted to religious writers, Renaissance drama, Metaphysical poets, and the Cavalier poets. Each entry includes a collection of resources including links to biographical material, texts, essays and other material.

The site also includes an extensive search function and an encylopedia that provides context for the literature.

London Stage Database

The London Stage Database is the latest in a long line of projects that aim to capture and present the rich array of information available on the theatrical culture of London, from the reopening of the public playhouses following the English civil wars in 1660 to the end of the eighteenth century. On a given night, in each of the city’s playhouses, hundreds or even thousands of spectators gathered to experience richly varied performance events that included not only plays, but prologues and epilogues, short afterpieces and farces, pantomimes, instrumental music, singing, and dancing. These events, taken together, provide a wealth of information about the rhythms of public life and the texture of popular culture in long-eighteenth-century London.

The Kit Marlowe Project

The Kit Marlowe Project is a digital space designed to introduce undergraduates with diverse majors to project-driven, research-based learning, and digital humanities practices in the context of studying one of Elizabethan England’s most compelling literary figures. As one of Shakespeare’s most famous contemporaries, Christopher Marlowe was a poet, playwright, and likely spy; his friends called him “Kit” and so do we. The site has been created so that students may curate an open-source collection of Marlowe’s works, contribute exhibits, encyclopedia, and bibliography entries, plus contribute to cultural preservation efforts by transcribing, encoding, and publishing archival works in an open-access forum. Excepting the About blogs, the Teaching Resources, the Contributor  Resources, and the Mini-Archive documentation, all content has been student-generated.

The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making

This ongoing open-access project seeks to represent the striking verse of Hester Pulter (1605-1678) in at least four versions: transcriptions of the manuscript; photographic facsimiles of its pages; Elemental Editions (basic modernizations with spare annotations); and contrastive Amplified Editions, created by a growing team of contributors. Side-by-side display enhances opportunities for comparison. Supporting Curations contextualize individual poems, and Explorations offer broader points of entry. An index features hyperlinked keywords to generate thematic subsets of the verse.

This site operates as both a teaching and a research resource for students and scholars of the English literary Renaissance. It not only provides freely-accessible editions of Pulter’s still little-known poetry, it also brings those editions into close contact with images of the unique manuscript witness, while contextualizing them through contact with other verbal and visual materials that help to integrate Pulter’s novel literary voice into the canon. The deliberate display of contrastive versions also helps to pull back the curtain on scholarly editing.

MIT Global Shakespeares: Video and Performance Archive

MIT Global Shakespeares: Video and Performance Archive

The Global Shakespeares Video & Performance Archive is a collaborative project providing online access to performances of Shakespeare from many parts of the world as well as essays and metadata provided by scholars and educators in the field. The archive is a work in progress and currently includes a catalogue of over 300 productions.

Private Libraries in Renaissance England

Private Libraries in Renaissance England

A companion to the published volumes of Private Libraries in Renaissance England, this searchable database is composed of book lists and library catalogs of private book collections in England collected from wills, inventories, and account ledgers.The aim of the collection is to reconstruct the history of book reading and collecting as well as the book trade.

Early Stuart Libels

Early Stuart Libels

Early Stuart Libels is a web-based edition of early seventeenth-century English political poetry from manuscript sources. It brings into the public domain over 350 poems, many of which have never before been published. The edition is divided into chronological and thematic sections for ease of navigation. It is fully searchable by name and source.