Christina-Akademien: Web Resource on Queen Christina of Sweden

http://www.christina-akademien.se/

The Christina Academy is a forum for scientific, historical, and artistic research on Queen Christina. The purpose is to spread knowledge about Christina and her time, and stimulate conversation and exchange between anyone interested in the Queen. The website is a hub for current projects, a resource for scholars, and a public platform that makes information about Christina more accessible. The site also includes short essays on topics related to Queen Christina written by experts in the field as well as research resources, timelines, and educational tools. The group also sponsors events, lectures, and programming related to Queen Christina and her circle for members.

TIDE: Keywords

What did it mean to be a stranger in sixteenth and seventeenth century England? How were other nations, cultures, and religions perceived? And what happened when individuals moved between languages, countries, religions, and spaces? TIDE: Keywords emerges from the collaborative work of ‘Travel, Transculturality, and Identity in England, c. 1550-1700’ (TIDE), a five-year interdisciplinary project funded by the European Research Council, exploring the development of the ideas of belonging and betweenness in early modern England.

Power of Petitioning in Seventeenth-Century England

https://petitioning.history.ac.uk/

‘The Power of Petitioning in Seventeenth-Century England’ is a two-year project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council which began in January 2019. The project team includes Brodie Waddell (Birkbeck), Jason Peacey (UCL) and Sharon Howard (Birkbeck), supported by many other scholars and contributors. This study will be the first to examine petitioning systematically at all levels of English government over the whole century. The project will create a valuable new resource by transcribing and digitising a corpus drawn from seven key collections of petitions held at national and local archives, totalling over 2,000 manuscripts. This corpus, when combined with careful contextualisation, allows us to offer new answers to crucial questions about the major social and political changes that unfolded in this formative period.

History of Medicine Research Guide

https://www.hsls.pitt.edu/history-of-medicine

From the Health Sciences Library System at the University of Pittsburgh. Includes Medical Humanities Dissertations: a monthly listing of recent doctoral dissertations worldwide covering aspects of the medical humanities including the history of medicine and science. Full text access to materials requires subscription through other databases.

EuroDocs

https://eudocs.lib.byu.edu/index.php/Main_Page

This site provides links to ‘European primary historical documents that are transcribed, reproduced in facsimile, or translated’ It has resources for most of the continent from prehistory to the present.

Digital Codex Mendoza

Digital Codex Mendoza

The Codex Mendoza was created under the orders of Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza to evoke an economic, political, and social panorama of the recently conquered lands. It was made in 1542 and since 1659 it has been in the collection of the Bodleian Library. This digital edition of the Codex Mendoza represents the first attempt to create a digital resource that permits in-depth study of a Mexican codex.

Secrets of Craft and Nature in Renaissance France. A Digital Critical Edition and English Translation of BnF Ms. Fr. 640

Secrets of Craft and Nature in Renaissance France. A Digital Critical Edition and English Translation of BnF Ms. Fr. 640

A production of the Making and Knowing Project, this edition provides a transcription and English translation of Ms. Fr. 640, composed by an anonymous “author-practitioner” in 1580s Toulouse and now held by the Bibliothèque nationale de France. This manuscript offers unique firsthand insight into making and materials from a time when artists were scientists. The research resources in this edition explore the manuscript’s context and diverse topics.

Patrons and Performances

Patrons and Performances

Professional performers of all kinds in England and Wales toured to provincial towns, monasteries and private residences before 1642. The Records of Early English Drama (REED) project is discovering fresh evidence about medieval and renaissance entertainment for publication in volumes for all English, Scottish and Welsh counties. The REED Patrons and Performances Web Site is designed to include a wide range of data about professional performers on tour in the provinces – their patrons, the performance venues they used and the routes they took across the kingdom.