Medici Archive Project

The Medici Archive Project began as an electronic database of letters and other documents in the Medici Granducal Archival Collection and has evolved into a research institute supporting digital projects and offering seminars and fellowships.

MAP’s online collection, BIA provides access to an unparalleled range of digitized early modern material. The material comprises over 24,000 transcribed documentary records, 18,000 biographical entries, 87,000 geographical and topographical tags, and over 300,000 digitized images from 292 volumes of the Mediceo del Principato. Aside from providing a faster and more user-friendly interface for document entry, BIA has enabled scholars from all over the world, not only to view digitized images of archival documents, but also to enter transcriptions, provide scholarly feedback, and exchange comments in designated forums, all within BIA’s academic community of over 2400 international scholars, students, and enthusiasts who daily engage with one another, with the ever-increasing number of uploaded digitized documents, and with the staff and fellows of the Medici Archive Project.

Premodern Italian Document Exchange (PIDE)

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced scholars to rethink how we access unpublished archival sources and conduct research. It is our hope that PIDE will help connect researchers with the sources they need to complete their ongoing projects, especially in light of reduced research budgets, greater travel restrictions, and more limited access to Italian archives and libraries. It is also our hope that PIDE will help to sustain and grow an already vibrant scholarly community working to expand our understanding of premodern Italy.

Hidden Florence

Website and free geolocated walking tour audio app for iPhone and Android keyed to the social and cultural history of Florence designed for wide user base and age group. With the app, the user navigates Florence toggling between a modern and a superbly detailed sixteenth-century map. On the website, users can read about each guide and the places they go (‘Stories’), discover more about the project team (‘About’), and find out how the characters were designed (‘Blog’).

Guide characters are:

Cosimo: Master of Florence, 1459
First citizen or godfather? Cosimo de’ Medici takes you through the city he’s spent a lifetime trying to make his own.

Giovanni: Neighbourhood World/People and Politics, 1490
Discover local worlds and get a different perspective on the heart of Florence as Giovanni, a wool worker, walks you through a day in his life.

Niccolosa: Saints and Sinners, 1492
Explore Florence’s sacred foundations with Niccolosa Alessandri as the city faces an uncertain future after the death of Lorenzo the Magnificent.

Marietta: City of Women, 1561
Join Marietta as she traces her journey from the city orphanage to life as a silk weaver.

Ercole: Crime and Punishment, 1566
From the torture chamber to the gallows, Ercole shows you how justice was done in the Renaissance city.

The app and website have been written by an international team of researchers and is a collaboration between the universities of Exeter, Cambridge and Toronto, with project partners at the National Gallery (London), Polo Museale della Toscana and Firenze Patrimonio Mondiale (UNESCO).

History of the Accademia di San Luca, c. 1590-1635: Documents from the Archivio di Stato di Roma

History of the Accademia di San Luca, c. 1590-1635: Documents from the Archivio di Stato di Roma

A project of the Center for Advanced Study of the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, the searchable database includes a complete transcription of every extant notarial record of the period from the Archivio di Stato di Roma identified by the project team, as well as a digital images of the original documents. The site also features artist bibliographies and a database of images associated with the early history of the Accademia di San Luca and its members during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.