DivineDotComedy

http://www.divinedotcomedy.org/

Website to accompany an edition of the Purgatorio, including videos analyzing in art-historical detail all of the most important illustrations and illuminations to Purgatorio from the fourteenth century to the nineteenth centuries.

Italian Academies Database

http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/ItalianAcademies/

The online interactive Database of Academies includes books published by Academies from 1525–1700 and people involved in Academies or in the publishing industry. It contains about 10,000 entries, in particular academicians, authors, contributors, dedicatees, printers, publishers, editors, illustrators, Academies’ emblems and lists of members, and lists of books published under their auspices. Each book is described through some 20 fields. Each person is searchable, as far as possible, according to dates, nationality, profession, gender, nickname in Academies, and their role in publications.

Letturatura artistica

Letturatura artistica

‘Letteratura artistica’ (Art Literature) is a private, non-profit blog publishing reviews of books and investigations on art history sources. All the articles are available both in English and in Italian (the author is based in Bologna, Italy and possesses a specialized library of more than 2000 volumes on the topic). The blog presents more than 400 articles covering the Middle Ages to contemporary art. A special focus is dedicated to Cennino Cennini’s Libro dell’Arte and Giorgio Vasari’s Vite (1550 and 1568 editions). Renaissance treatises are discussed, not only in Italian, but in Dutch, English, French and Spanish. An index of all the published articles is available here.

Renaissance Dante in Print (1472-1629)

Renaissance Dante in Print (1472-1629)

THIS EXHIBITION presents Renaissance editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy from the John A. Zahm, C.S.C., Dante Collection at the University of Notre Dame, together with selected treasures from The Newberry Library. The Zahm collection ranks among the top Dante collections in North America. Purchased for the most part by Zahm in 1902 from the Italian Dantophile Giulio Acquaticci, the 15th- and 16th- century imprints presented here form the heart of Zahm’s collection, which totals nearly 3,000 volumes, including rare editions and critical studies from the Renaissance to the present. The nine incunable editions and nearly complete series of 16th-century imprints featured in this exhibit constitute essential primary sources for both the history of Dante’s reception during the Renaissance and the early history of the printed book.

The concentrated Dante collection at Notre Dame is nicely complemented by the wide-ranging holdings of The Newberry Library in Renaissance literature and history, and especially for the history of printing and publishing. These two rich and varied collections have often been used by Dantists in the Midwest and from abroad. The complementarity of the collections is mirrored in the formal cooperation of Notre Dame and The Newberry Library through the consortium of The Newberry Library Center for Renaissance Studies, of which Notre Dame has been an active member since 1983. The exhibit was originally held at the Department of Special Collections, University Libraries, University of Notre Dame, October 15 – December 15, 1993 and the Newberry Library between 15 April – 15 June, 1994, and has been produced in expanded form for Internet publication by a collaboration between the William and Katherine Devers Program in Dante Studies, University of Notre Dame and the ARTFL Project of the University of Chicago. The Devers Program, the ARTFL Project, and the Newberry Library are proud to welcome you to Renaissance Dante in Print (1472-1629).

Digital Dante

Digital Dante

Digital Dante offers original research and ideas on Dante: on his thought and work and on various aspects of his reception. Though our editorial structure is that of an academic journal, we do not publish prose essays, instead showcasing work that intersperses prose with visual components (see Author Guidelines). We accept contributions from scholars and Dante lovers around the world.

We feature original scholarship on Dante in three different contexts:

1) The Commento Baroliniano is the first online commentary to the Divine Comedy. The Commento is an original work written expressly for Digital Dante and it distills a lifetime of scholarship.

2) Intertextual Dante is a vehicle for intertextual study of the Divine Comedy developed by Julie Van Peteghem and featuring her original scholarship on Dante and Ovid.

3) ImageSoundHistory and Text are the categories through which we present original pieces contributed by artists, philosophers, and scholars from around the world.

The World of Dante

The World of Dante

This site includes the Italian text and Allen Mandelbaum’s translation of the Divine Comedy marked up in XML, an interactive timeline, an interactive version of Botticelli’s Chart of Hell, an array of maps of Dante’s Italy and all three realms of the afterlife, musical recordings of the liturgical chants and hymns mentioned in Purgatory and Paradise, a gallery of more than 600 images, a searchable database, and teaching resources and activities.

Manus: Censimento dei manoscritti delle biblioteche italiane

Manus: Censimento dei manoscritti delle biblioteche italiane

MANUS è un database che comprende la descrizione e le immagini digitalizzate dei manoscritti conservati nelle biblioteche italiane pubbliche, ecclesiastiche e private. While not full text, the database often includes detailed descriptions and/or summaries of the contents of the manuscripts.