Renaissance Polychrome Sculpture in Puglia and Basilicata

http://qspace.library.queensu.ca/handle/1974/29070

The Renaissance art in Puglia and Basilicata is much less known than the heavily touristed and much studied sites in central Italy. Life-sized painted sculptures, many carved out of local stone, inhabit rough-walled cave churches and elaborate classically inspired mausolea. An elegantly attired angel hacks repeatedly at a cowering dragon, a saint looks unperturbed as her fingers sink into a lion’s mouth, a mother grins toothily as she cuddles her baby, and shepherds blow into bagpipes while stone sheep graze nearby. Artists placed holy narratives in spaces like the rocky landscape around them, and dressed sacred personages in local dress, while at the same time harkening back to an ancient past shrouded in myth and mystery. The art is both distinctively local and cosmopolitan, drawing upon influences from around the Adriatic and beyond. This open access database offers high-resolution images of and information about (with a catalog entry and bibliography for each work) over 100 objects, along with an interactive digital map. Approximately 1,000 high-resolution photographs can be downloaded and used free of charge for research, teaching, and publication. This database was created by Claire Litt and Una D’Elia (Queen’s University).

In addition to supporting scholarship on this understudied region by offering open access photographs, this database is a rich resource for teaching, as students can carry out research, curate, and publish their own virtual exhibitions using the database. (Links to undergraduate and graduate student exhibitions are provided on the homepage.)

Renaissance and Baroque Polychrome Sculpture in Lombardy and Piedmont

http://qspace.library.queensu.ca/handle/1974/29202

The mountains and lakes of Lombardy and Piedmont are both picturesque and rich with little-known cultural heritage. In the Renaissance and Baroque, northern Italy, which bordered Protestant lands, was central to promoting and supporting the Catholic faith. Life-sized painted sculptures made of wood, terracotta, and other materials were arranged to create naturalistic tableaux in chapels on holy mountains (Sacri Monti), pilgrimage sites which the devout visited at night, whipping themselves before sculptures must have seemed to come to life by the flickering light of lanterns. Sculpted bodies with a range of skin tones, some thin from suffering and illness and others Herculean in their muscular energy, have actual hair and are bound with real ropes or eat from real dishes. Other fleshy sculptures inhabit huge, theatrical altarpieces. Many of these living statues continue to be the focus of cult today and so are adorned with real jewelry and other offerings made by the faithful. These sculptures are site specific, embedded in the landscape, politics, and devotional practices of the region, but also the work of cosmopolitan artists and patrons with international connections. This database offers high-resolution images of and information about over 185 sculptures and sculptural groups, along with an interactive digital map. The information is in the form of a catalog entry with bibliography for each sculpture or sculptural group. Over 1,300 high-resolution photographs are available for download and can be used free of charge for research, teaching, and publication. This database was created by Kennis Forte and Una D’Elia (Queen’s University).

In addition to supporting scholarship in this understudied area by offering open access photographs that can be published free of charge, this database is a rich resource for teaching, as students can carry out research, curate, and publish their own virtual exhibitions using the database (links to undergraduate and graduate student exhibitions provided on the homepage).

Exchanging Views: The Viceroys of Naples and the Spanish Monarchy’s Image in the Baroque

Exchanging Views is an in-depth and well-organized historical research on the Viceroys of Naples, with a focus on their cultural and artistic patronage. The site is a resource for research and teaching on cross-cultural exchange in the early modern Mediterranean & on the Spanish monarchy between the 16th and 18th centuries. Exchanging Views is designed to be accessible and easy to navigate for undergraduates, and relevant across historical sub-fields. Produced jointly by the Universitat de Barcelona and the University “La Sapienza” in Rome.

Geschichte Venedigs

http://www.geschichte-venedigs.de/index.html

Auf unserer Website, die der Geschichte Venedigs und derjenigen Kanadas gewidmet ist. Sie sollte sowohl für Anfänger und Neugierige geeignet sein, als auch für diejenigen, die aus Reiselust oder aus beruflichem Interesse hier gelandet sind. Neben Darstellungen zu einem breiten Themenspektrum finden Sie hier fortlaufend ergänzte Bibliografien, vielfach mit der Möglichkeit einen Blick in die Publikationen zu werfen oder sie gleich zu erwerben

Italian Academies Database

http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/ItalianAcademies/

The online interactive Database of Academies includes books published by Academies from 1525–1700 and people involved in Academies or in the publishing industry. It contains about 10,000 entries, in particular academicians, authors, contributors, dedicatees, printers, publishers, editors, illustrators, Academies’ emblems and lists of members, and lists of books published under their auspices. Each book is described through some 20 fields. Each person is searchable, as far as possible, according to dates, nationality, profession, gender, nickname in Academies, and their role in publications.

Early Modern Italy: A Comprehensive Bibliography in English and French

https://www.academia.edu/7820421/Early_Modern_Italy_1550-1790_A_Comprehensive_Bibliography_of_titles_in_English_and_French_12th_edition_2016

This ongoing work was conceived as an adjunct to the textbook The Origins of Early Modern Italy, 1550–1800 in order to place at the disposal of students and scholars the complete span of scholarship on Italy published in English and French. The material encompasses all aspects of political, social, economic, and cultural life in the broader Italy, including Corsica and Malta, and the mutual influence of Italy and other European countries. It contains an introduction and historiographical overview, supported by a statistical breakdown of types of studies over the last 150 years.

Drawings of the Florentine Painters

The Drawings of the Florentine Painters, a robust digital resource based on Berenson’s publication of the same name, allows users to search for nearly 4000 drawings by artist, title (i.e. subject, in English or Italian), location, and technique. Each entry includes key information from all three editions of Berenson’s text (1903, 1938 in English; 1961, in Italian), as well as the current location, an image of the catalog page, and plates included in 1903; most entries also have links to museum webpages, including images.