Post-Reformation Digital Library

http://www.prdl.org/

A select database of digital books relating to the development of theology and philosophy during the Reformation and Post-Reformation/Early Modern Era (late 15th-18th c.). Late medieval and patristic works printed and referenced in the early modern era are also included. The PRDL is a project of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research.

John Foxe’s The Acts and Monuments Online

http://www.johnfoxe.org/

Includes the unabridged texts of the four editions of this massive work published in John Foxe’s lifetime (1563, 1570, 1576, 1583). Search and view modern transcriptions that keep as close as possible to the original texts, identify the individuals and places that are mentioned in the text, and explore the latest scholarship to understand the sources upon which it was based, and the purposes for which they were deployed. Facsimiles of all the woodcut illustrations in the text can be viewed along with commentaries. Significant passages in Latin and Greek are translated.

GEMMS: Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons

GEMMS: Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons

The Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons (GEMMS) is a SSHRC-funded project to create an open-access, group-sourced, comprehensive, fully searchable, online bibliographic database of early modern (1530-1715) sermon manuscripts from the British Isles and North America.

The database is a finding aid for all types of manuscripts related to sermons, including complete sermons, sermon notes and reports of sermons, held in numerous repositories in the UK, Ireland, the USA and Canada. GEMMS endeavours to make manuscript sermons more accessible for a wide variety of researchers, to encourage research on manuscript sermons and to provide a forum for the development of an online community of sermon scholars.

Remembering the Reformation

Remembering the Reformation

2017 is the 500th anniversary of an event that is widely regarded as having precipitated the Protestant Reformation: the posting of Martin Luther’s 95 theses on a church door in the small German town of Wittenberg on 31 October 1517. In the intervening centuries, this episode has become deeply embedded in myth and legend. Although scholars now doubt whether it occurred in precisely this form, its anniversary is serving to stimulate fresh discussion and debate about the momentous schism within Christendom that took place in its wake, and its long term repercussions and effects.

This exhibition is one of the principal fruits of ‘Remembering the Reformation’, an interdisciplinary and collaborative research project generously funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (http://rememberingthereformation.org.uk/). Bringing together historians (Alex Walsham and Ceri Law, University of Cambridge) and literary scholars (Brian Cummings and Bronwyn Wallace, University of York), it investigates how Europe’s multiple and competing Reformations were remembered, forgotten, contested, and re-invented.  It explores how the memories of these movements were created and emerged in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as well as the complex, plural, and enduring legacies such memories have left.

Prefaced by a general section on Memory, the exhibition is divided into twelve categories that reflect the four themes around which the ‘Remembering the Reformation’ project is organised: (1) Lives and Afterlives ; (2) Events and Temporalities; (3) Objects, Places, and Spaces; and (4) Ritual, Liturgy, and the Body. A joint enterprise involving Cambridge University Library, Lambeth Palace Library and York Minster Library, the exhibition displays some of the many treasures in their rich manuscript, rare book, and artefact collections, as well as items from several other repositories in Cambridge and beyond.

Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation

Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation

A uniquely valuable resource for historians, theologians, political scientists, and sociologists studying the religious and social upheavals of the 16th and 17th centuries, the Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation gives researchers immediate, Web-based access to an extensive range of seminal works from the Reformation and post-Reformation eras. 

With 845 titles by 277 authors, the collection is a treasury of theological writings, biblical commentaries, confessional documents, social and political works, sermons, letters, polemical treatises, and other key documents from this critical epoch in European history.

By subscription.

Rome Reborn: The Vatican Library and Renaissance Culture

Rome Reborn: The Vatican Library and Renaissance Culture

A Library of Congress Exhibition from 8 January–30 April 1993 (Vatican Library manuscripts). This older version of the site has some additional images and better image credits.