Virtual Paul’s Cross Project

Virtual Paul’s Cross Project

The Virtual Paul’s Cross Project uses visual and acoustic modeling software to combine visual images from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries with measurements of these buildings made during archaeological surveys of their foundations. The Project also integrates into the visual model the look of a November day in London. The acoustic simulation recreates the acoustic properties of Paul’s Churchyard. As a result, we may hear all two hours of John Donne’s sermon for Gunpowder Day in the space of its original delivery and acoustic context.

The World of Dante

The World of Dante

This site includes the Italian text and Allen Mandelbaum’s translation of the Divine Comedy marked up in XML, an interactive timeline, an interactive version of Botticelli’s Chart of Hell, an array of maps of Dante’s Italy and all three realms of the afterlife, musical recordings of the liturgical chants and hymns mentioned in Purgatory and Paradise, a gallery of more than 600 images, a searchable database, and teaching resources and activities.

Jesuit Online Bibliography

Jesuit Online Bibliography

No other resource for early modern scholarship is as comprehensive as EEBO. Users can explore complete, digitized images of all the works listed in the key bibliographic records of English literature: The Short-Title Catalogue (Pollard & Redgrave, 1475-1640); The Short- Title Catalogue II (Wing, 1641-1700); The Thomson Tracts; and the Early English Books Tract Supplements, as well as original almanacs, pamphlets, musical scores, prayer books and other intriguing primary sources. Through a partnership with ProQuest, EEBO access is offered to current RSA members at no additional cost.

Jesuitica

Jesuitica

The Maurits Sabbe Library of the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies (KU Leuven, Belgium) is home to an impressive Jesuitica book collection of almost 100,000 books. 20,000 books printed before 1840 and more than 40,000 from the later 19th and 20th century have been properly described and catalogued. This project aims at disclosing the remaining uncatalogued books, providing easy access to its contents and stimulating academic research in the field of Jesuit studies.

Art of Disagreeing Badly: Religious Dispute in Early Modern Europe

Art of Disagreeing Badly: Religious Dispute in Early Modern Europe

The exhibition “The Art of Disagreeing Badly: Religious Dispute in Early Modern Europe” is now permanently available on an interactive website. The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were an age of confessional polemic. After the beginning of the Reformation in 1517, church history presented a challenge to each confession in its own right. Protestants aimed to explain, through examples from history, why error had come into the Church after apostolic times and after centuries of decadence the Reformation had become necessary. Catholics argued, on the other hand, that the Church had always remained the same. Protestants also doubted specific key events in church history. They asserted, for example, that St. Peter had never been in Rome, so that the Petrine tradition, on which the papacy based its own primacy, was invalid. Catholics, of course, never doubted Peter’s stay in Rome. Many other such polemical arguments were thrown back and forth, making church history a hot battleground of the confessional struggle. A large number of the books exhibited are from the collection of Tobie Matthew, Archbishop of York (1546–1628).

The 1641 Depositions Project

A fully searchable digital repository of depositions or witness testimonies from the 1641 Irish rebellion housed at Trinity College Dublin Library. The resource comprises transcripts and images of all 8,000 depositions, examinations, and associated materials which provide insight into the cultural, religious, and political history of seventeenth-century Ireland.

The site includes historical background, bibliographic resources, a detailed user guide, browsing, and search functions.

Correspondence of Athanasius Kircher

Correspondence of Athanasius Kircher

The Athanasius Kircher correspondence project provides access to the manuscript correspondence of Kircher, a seventeenth-century Jesuit. The project is a collaboration between the Istituto e Museo di Storia della Scienza in Florence, the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, and the European University Institute in Fiesole, under the direction of Michael John Gorman and Nick Wilding; it is now housed at Stanford University.

An Analytic Bibliography of Online Neo-Latin Texts

An Analytic Bibliography of Online Neo-Latin Texts

A database of 38,000+ links to freely accessible electronic texts and digitized photographic reproductions of Neo-Latin works, dating from late fifteenth century to present, organized by author/commentator and title. Searchable