Project Vox

http://projectvox.library.duke.edu/

An extensive collection of early modern women’s writing that includes texts, teaching resources, an online lab for tool exploration, and digital publications on the collection.

Women and Shakespeare

Women & Shakespeare Podcast is a monthly series that features conversations with diverse women directors, actors, writers, and academics who are involved in making and interpreting Shakespeare. It is designed to harness digital humanities to redress the gender and racial disparity in academic citational practices, public discourse, and rehearsal room power dynamics in the field of Shakespeare studies and performance. Funded by NYU (New York University), Series 1 includes guests ranging from renowned actors Dona Croll, Kathy Pogson, and Janet Suzman to Orwell prize-winning author, Dr Delia Jarett Macauley to Head of Higher Education and Research at Shakespeare’s Globe and Vice-President of the Shakespeare Association of America, Professor Farah Karim-Cooper, to multiple award-winning playwright Chris Bush.

Marguerite de Roberval: A Web-Based Approach to Teaching a Renaissance Heroine

Marguerite de Roberval: A Web-Based Approach to Teaching a Renaissance Heroine

This resource offers approaches to teaching Marguerite de Roberval, a young French woman who survived being marooned on a perilous island in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence during the sixteenth century. She was the inspiration for three published works in Renaissance France and numerous other accounts since then.

Teaching La Princesse de Clèves: A Web-Based Approach to a Seventeenth-Century Text

Teaching La Princesse de Clèves: A Web-Based Approach to a Seventeenth-Century Text

A website designed for exploring La Princesse de Clèves with undergraduates, including teaching ideas, worksheets and discussion materials, and a list of film adaptations.

Books of Duchesses: Mapping Women Book Owners in Francophone Europe, 1350-1550

Books of Duchesses – Mapping Women Book Owners in Francophone Europe, 1350-1550

This project collects, organizes, and presents data related to late-medieval and early modern laywomen and their books. Through an interactive map of Europe, users are able to visualize networks of manuscripts, texts, and readers and explore the libraries and peregrinations of women book owners.

The data collected in the project has the potential to shift scholarly paradigms by challenging narratives of national literary history and uncovering the active role played by women in creating, consuming literary and material culture and in circulating texts across national, geographic, and generational borders.